Select Page
Home  Car Insurance  Drinking and Driving-Your Worst Nightmare

Drinking and Driving-Your Worst Nightmare

Get 30+ Car Insurance Quotes in 5 minutes



It’s bewildering to think that even after all the warnings relating to the high costs of driving impaired, people still continue to practice it. Every day in Canada, someone is either arrested or becomes a fatality of this dangerous act. Therefore, it is quite clear to assert that the costs of driving impaired are both high financially and on human life. Does impaired driving impact on car insurance? What are some of the implications in Canada? These are just but a few of the concerns this piece will try to bring to light.

An impaired driving conviction can have devastating effects on your car insurance rate. You do not even have to be involved in an accident; drivers with DUIs always pay more in terms of insurance premiums as compared to the other drivers. This can be attributed to the fact that insurance companies try their level best to avoid high risk car insurance.

Glenn Cooper, a spokesperson at Aviva even said that, ”In our view, an impaired driver is more likely to be a repeat offender and has an increased risk of causing a serious accident. Those convicted of impaired driving, even if not involved in an accident, have made an unsafe choice putting many others at risk.”

Most of the private insurance companies operating in Canada have come up with a policy stating that they’ll not insure drivers who have been convicted of drunk driving; at least for three years after their conviction. This always poses as a challenge to these drivers as they are normally forced to seek facility insurance. Facility insurance is viewed as the market of last chances for drivers who find it hard to get insurance from regular insurance companies.

According to CAA spokesman Kristine D’Arbelles, impaired driving is rated among the high risk car insurance Canada hence can explain the high premiums. D’Arbelles says, ” Why do drivers with an impaired conviction pay higher premiums? The obvious answer is because they’re a higher risk. We don’t have any actual data that shows impaired drivers will reoffend one or two or three times, but impaired convictions tend to be a chronic issue.”

In a typical Ontario case, a convicted DUI driver is susceptible to a premium increase from about $2,000 to somewhere between $8,500 and $10,000 annually. These high costs have resulted to drivers shunning from disclosing fully their DUI conviction status. Others fail to insure their vehicles entirely posing a risk to not only themselves but also to the other drivers.